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Wednesday, December 05, 2007

The power curve


This graph is from a video showing how unevenly wealth is distributed in the U.S.


In a fascinating interview this morning, Ford Harding related the importance of the Power Curve in defining success in networking, marketing and wealth. Simply put, a very few get most of the value and business, and then things drop sharply to the great masses. This suggests of course there is little room at the top -- unless you are first, or really better than anyone else out there.

These observations can be daunting to someone wishing to break through and succeed in AEC marketing. Harding, for example has literally written the book on "Rainmaking" -- the traits required to sell professional services. He has an updated edition coming out and will be sending me an advance copy. If you read his books, and diligently follow his suggestions, I'm confident you, too, could become a Rainmaker yourself.

But most of us simply won't. We won't build the network, the connection-base, the complex web of relationships and sharing that you need to achieve this type of success. I suppose that is okay for those of us either at the top or on our way there (and yes, I'll put myself in that category).

However, I don't think the power curve should discourage you if you think about things this way -- there are many ways to set yourself to be at the higher end of the power curve; and (to me) the best is excellence within your niche or area of expertise and/or the first. Surprising things happen when you are -- and it is great to scale the heights when you figure the way up.

2 comments:

Sonny Lykos said...

“But most of us simply won't. We won't build the network, the connection-base, the complex web of relationships and sharing that you need to achieve this type of success. But most of us simply won't. We won't build the network, the connection-base, the complex web of relationships and sharing that you need to achieve this type of success.”

You’re right. Most won’t, and most, don’t.

I bought “Rain Making” a while ago, after I became a rain maker in my current business.

It started with doing some work for a condo association. Then it included doing work for other associations that were clients of the original one’s property management company. I created a plan to duplicate that with other property mgt. companies.

Then it started when asked to do some work by a condo unit owner of an association I was serving. Then I’d get a job for a condo unit owner in a new association, then from another unit owner in the same association, and before I knew it, their Board was asking me to take care of “common element” repairs.

Once one realizes the opportunities, s/he must create a plan to take advantage of such situations.

As I see it, the problem with those (going back to your statement above) who “won’t", won’t because it entails salesmanship, and most business owners, regardless of industry, don’t like to sell. They prefer doing what they like to do, and the reason they started their business. And that brings to mind your column of Nov. 30, about “The Common Denominator of Success.” To quote Albert Gray again: “Successful people formed the habit of doing things that failures don't like to do.”

Mark Buckshon said...

Sonny, you are right -- and indeed most 'business owners, regardless of industry, don't like to sell."
The challenge for those of us in that category is to find a way to sell that is natural and effective for us as individuals -- my heart has always been in journalism and writing so that is where my selling should be -- but where it gets interesting is when you find the skill to correctly hire and lead a group of great salespeople. If you have this ability, of course, you are on the way to a truly incredible business, again regardless of industry.